Difference between revisions of "Is-Ought Dichotomy"

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'''The Is-Ought Dichotomy''' is considered a false [[Metaphysics|metaphysical]] dichotomy because it contradicts the [[Axioms|axiom]] of [[Identity]] and its corollary [[Causality]]. By the axiom and its corollary, what an existent '''''is''''' determines what it '''''ought''''' to do.
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'''The Is-Ought Dichotomy''' is a term used to describe the classic "fact-value gap" that has plagued many philosophers in the past. The dichotomy itself says that the metaphysical facts of reality (what something "is") are in a separate realm than the values of ethics (what one "ought" to do about it).
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Objectivism considers this a false dichotomy for one main reason: Because man's life is the standard of values, a fact of reality is evaluated on that standard and a value-judgment is formed as to the degree in which it furthers or acts against man's life.
  
 
==Further Reading==
 
==Further Reading==
 
*[http://aynrandlexicon.com/lexicon/is-ought_dichotomy.html "Is-Ought Dichotomy" at the Ayn Rand Lexicon]
 
*[http://aynrandlexicon.com/lexicon/is-ought_dichotomy.html "Is-Ought Dichotomy" at the Ayn Rand Lexicon]

Latest revision as of 16:15, 18 September 2010

The Is-Ought Dichotomy is a term used to describe the classic "fact-value gap" that has plagued many philosophers in the past. The dichotomy itself says that the metaphysical facts of reality (what something "is") are in a separate realm than the values of ethics (what one "ought" to do about it).

Objectivism considers this a false dichotomy for one main reason: Because man's life is the standard of values, a fact of reality is evaluated on that standard and a value-judgment is formed as to the degree in which it furthers or acts against man's life.

Further Reading